Crispy Hash Browns

5 from 1 vote

Crispy hash browns are the perfect addition to your brunch menu! With simple ingredients, these potatoes are so yummy and easy.

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These hash browns, with their perfect crispy golden crust, are so good! With a short list of ingredients–just potatoes and seasonings along with olive oil and butter to crisp them up–and less than 30 minutes to prep and cook, you’ll want to make them all the time. Grab some potatoes and I’ll show you how to cook hash browns in a frying pan!

Crispy hash browns in a cast iron skillet pan.
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A pile of golden crispy hash browns on your breakfast plate is perfect for easygoing weekend mornings or simple brunches. I love to serve these hashbrowns with fried eggs, some toast, and cherry tomatoes or fresh fruit for a delicious and wholesome breakfast. Hash browns are really easy to make, but there are a couple of tricks to getting that moist and tender interior with a golden crunchy crust. So get your ketchup ready! Here’s all you need to know about how to make hash browns from boiled potatoes.

Recipe at a Glance

Cuisine Inspiration: American
Primary Cooking Method: Stovetop
Dietary Info: Vegetarian, Gluten Free
Key Flavor: Earthy and slightly salty
Skill Level: Easy

Ingredients to Make Hash Browns

Ingredients for recipe: Potatoes, olive oil, butter, salt, pepper, and onion powder.
  • Potatoes: Russet potatoes, also called baking potatoes or Idaho potatoes, are the gold standard for hash browns because of their high starch content and their relatively dry interior, which allows them to make perfectly crispy hash browns.
  • Salt & pepper: A must in any hash brown recipe! Adjust to your tastes.
  • Onion powder: An optional ingredient, but I do recommend it because it adds a touch of onion flavor.
  • Olive oil: For browning. Use your favorite brand.
  • Butter: Also, for browning your hash browns. Butter adds flavor and helps crisp them up when combined with olive oil.
  • Substitute Yukon Gold potatoes: While they likely won’t crisp up as well as Russets do, they have a buttery taste that’s delicious in hash browns.
  • Add more seasonings: If you want to add more flavor to your hash browns, try adding a bit of chili powder, sweet paprika, dried thyme, and/or garlic powder. Or add some finely diced fresh herbs like dill, parsley, or rosemary.
  • Swap in avocado oil for the olive oil: Avocado oil has a high smoke point and is an excellent alternative for frying hash browns.
  • Make vegan hash browns: Sub the butter with additional oil for a plant-based alternative.
  • Garnish with green: For some color, top your cooked hash browns with sliced scallions, snipped chives, or chopped parsley.

How to Make Hash Browns

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil and set a steamer basket inside. Add the potatoes and cover. Steam until partially cooked; a fork can be inserted into the potatoes with some effort, but there is still some resistance.
  2. Let the potatoes cool enough to handle, then cut them in half (or quarters if they’re large).
  3. Use a box grater or a food processor with a shredding attachment to process the potatoes into small shreds.
  4. Heat some oil and butter in a heavy-bottomed skillet. When hot, spread the potatoes evenly in the pan.
  5. Cook the potatoes undisturbed until the bottom becomes golden and crispy. Add the remaining oil and butter, and flip the hash browns over to cook the other side.
  6. Cook until the other side is golden brown and crisp.
6-image collage cooking hash browns: 1 - Potatoes in a steamer basket over a pot of water; 2 - Potatoes cut into quarters after steaming; 3 - Quartered potatoes after processing through the shredding attachment in the bowl of processor with salt, pepper, and onion powder sprinkled on top; 4 - Shredded potatoes in a single layer on oiled pan; 5 - Drizzling extra oil on top after bottom begins to brown; 6 - Browned, crispy potatoes after being flipped.

Tips for Making the Best Hash Browns in a Frying Pan

  1. Steam your potatoes just until partially cooked. Poke them with a toothpick, skewer, or fork. If you’re able to insert the fork, yet it still meets some resistance, they’re partially done.
  2. Don’t press down! It can be hard to resist, but don’t press down on the hash browns while they’re cooking. This can cause them to compress too much and cause a mushy, mashed potato interior. Letting them cook undisturbed in the pan is the best way to make homemade hash browns.
  3. Make sure the oil & butter are hot enough before adding your potatoes. If you add a shred of potato and it sizzles, it’s hot enough to add your hash browns.
  4. Use the large holes of your grater. If you’re using a box grater, use the large holes to shred your potatoes. The small holes will just give you potato mush.
Spatula scooping out a serving of crispy hash browns from a skillet.

What to Serve With Homemade Hash Browns

How to Store & Reheat Hash Browns

Allow hash browns to cool to room temperature, then place in an airtight container and store them in the refrigerator. Reheat in a skillet for 5-8 minutes to warm them through and re-crisp them.

How Long Will Hash Browns Last in the Fridge?

Hash browns will last in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Can I Freeze Hash Browns from Boiled Potatoes?

Yes! Your best bet is to freeze your partially cooked potatoes after you’ve shredded them. Spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet and move them to the fridge. After they’ve frozen, transfer them to a freezer bag or airtight container and keep them frozen for up to 3 months. To prepare them, transfer the frozen potato shreds to the refrigerator to thaw overnight, then cook them in your skillet as directed in the recipe.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do my hash browns turn mushy?

I have a couple of tips for preventing mushy hash browns. First, make sure your potatoes are only partially steamed. Second, when you cook them, make sure they cook untouched on each side. Resist the urge to press down on them, stir them, or flip them. This helps create light, crispy hash browns that aren’t mushy.

Can I cube the potatoes for hash browns instead of shredding them?

Yes, however, for the method of cooking I’ve shared here, you’ll want to make sure you’ve diced your potatoes small. You’ll also need to stir them a few more times than when cooking shredded hash browns.

Can I use red potatoes for in hash browns?

I don’t recommend waxy potatoes such as fingerlings or red potatoes in shredded hash browns because they are higher in moisture so you won’t get crisp edges like you do with russets.

Crispy hash browns on a plate with cherry tomatoes, toast with butter, and a fried egg.

With a golden crunch that gives way to a buttery and fluffy interior, these hash browns are the best. You’ll love the short list of ingredients and the small amount of effort it takes for absolutely delicious, golden, and crispy hash browns!

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Crispy Hash Browns

Crispy hash browns are the perfect addition to your brunch menu! With simple ingredients, these potatoes are so yummy and easy.
5 from 1 vote
Servings 4 servings
Course Breakfast
Calories 259
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 24 minutes
0 minutes
Total Time 29 minutes
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Ingredients
  

  • 2 large russet potatoes about 1 ¼ pounds, scrubbed
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder optional
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil divided
  • 2 tablespoons butter divided

Instructions

  • Bring a pot of water to a boil and set up a steamer basket or colander on top. Place the potatoes in the basket, cover with a lid, and steam for about 8 minutes until they are partially cooked. Let the potatoes cool enough to handle, then cut them in half lengthwise.
  • Use a food processor with the shredding disc attachment or a box grater to transform the partially cooked potatoes into hash browns. Season with salt, pepper, and onion powder (if using) and use a spoon to toss together.
  • In a large, heavy bottom skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of oil and 1 tablespoon of butter over medium to medium-high heat. Once the skillet is hot, spread the shredded potatoes evenly across it, allowing them to cook undisturbed for about 8 minutes until one side becomes golden and crispy. If the potatoes are cooking too quickly, reduce the heat.
  • Drizzle the remaining oil and place the remaining butter over the hash browns and, using a large spatula, carefully flip them to cook the other side. Optionally, use the spatula to divide the hash browns into 4 sections for easier flipping. Cook for an additional 7-8 minutes until the other side achieves a similar golden-brown crispiness.

Notes

Storage: Allow hash browns to cool to room temperature, then place in an airtight container and store them in the refrigerator. Reheat in a skillet for 5-8 minutes to warm them through and re-crisp them. Hash browns will last in the fridge for up to 3 days. 
Freezer: Your best bet is to freeze your partially cooked potatoes after you’ve shredded them. Spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet and move them to the fridge. After they’ve frozen, transfer them to a freezer bag or airtight container and keep frozen for up to 3 months. To prepare them, transfer the frozen potato shreds to the refrigerator to thaw overnight, then cook them in your skillet as directed in the recipe.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cup, Calories: 259kcal, Carbohydrates: 34g, Protein: 4g, Fat: 13g, Saturated Fat: 5g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 7g, Trans Fat: 0.2g, Cholesterol: 15mg, Sodium: 345mg, Potassium: 777mg, Fiber: 2g, Sugar: 1g, Vitamin A: 178IU, Vitamin C: 11mg, Calcium: 28mg, Iron: 2mg

Nutrition information provided is an estimate. It will vary based on cooking method and specific ingredients used.

Cuisine American
Course: Breakfast
5 from 1 vote

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Comments

  1. Ghada says:

    Great idea to partially cook the potatoes first! This is great 👍