How to Peel Tomatoes

5 from 114 votes

This tutorial shows a simple method for how to peel and seed tomatoes when you have a bunch of fresh tomatoes- substitute for canned tomatoes

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Here is the way I peel tomatoes. Removing the seeds and tougher outer skin leaves tomatoes with the perfect texture and taste for pasta sauces, soups, and all other recipes based on canned tomatoes.

How to peel and seed a tomato - showing peeled tomato on cutting board

If you find yourself with a surplus with fresh tomatoes from the summer, take advantage of the bounty and substitute them in places where you usually reach for canned. Peeling is also the usual first step in canning tomatoes for long-term storage.

Why should you peel tomatoes for sauce

There is a reason your favorite brand of canned tomatoes is labeled “peeled.” When cooked, the tomato skins get tougher and float apart. They do not cook down like the tomato flesh. The skin also becomes bitter.

On the other hand, tomato skin is loaded with lycopene, a nutritious antioxidant. If you want to keep the skins, consider running your cooked recipe through a food mill – if practical.

How to peel tomatoes properly

  • Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil.
  • Cut an ‘X” in the bottom of each tomato. Cut just deep enough to penetrate the skin.
  • Prepare a bowl with ice water.
  • Place the tomato carefully into the boiling water and simmer for one minute.
  • Remove the tomato and place in the ice bath.
Collage showing how to mark x at the bottom of tomato, boil and blanch it

When cool enough to handle, peel the skin; it should remove very easily, coming off section by section.

Collage showing step by step how to peel a tomato after boiling

Here is your naked tomato.

Peeled large tomato on cutting board

How to seed tomatoes

Cut the tomato in half (equatorially.)

Cutting tomato in half

gently squeeze the tomato to remove the seeds.

Removing seeds and juice from tomato

Your fresh, peeled and seeded tomatoes are ready to make a sauce, use in chili, or any other recipe where you would usually use canned tomatoes.

Tomatoes piled in glass mason jar

When tomatoes are in season, I load up and use them in every way possible.

Recipes with peeled tomatoes

For more cooking tutorials, check out:

If you’ve found this cooking resource for How to Peel Tomatoes helpful or if you’ve tried any recipe on FeelGoodFoodie, then don’t forget to rate the recipe and leave me a comment below! I would love to hear about your experience with this technique. And if you snapped some shots of it, share it with me on Instagram so I can repost on my stories!

How to Peel and Seed a Tomato

This tutorial shows a simple method for how to peel and seed tomatoes when you have a bunch of fresh tomatoes- substitute for canned tomatoes
5 from 114 votes
Servings 1 serving
Course Ingredient, Sauces
Calories 22
Prep Time 2 mins
Cook Time 1 min
Total Time 3 mins

Ingredients
  

  • 1 tomato or as needed

Instructions

  • Fill a pot with water, bring to a boil.
  • Cut an “X” in the bottom of each tomato, just deep enough to penetrate the skin.
  • Prepare a bowl of water with ice.
  • Place the tomato carefully into the boiling water and simmer for one minute.
  • Remove the tomato and place in the ice bath.
  • When cool enough to handle, peel the skin; it should remove very easily.
  • Cut the tomato in half (equatorially), gently squeeze the tomato to remove the seeds

Nutrition

Calories: 22kcal, Carbohydrates: 5g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 1g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 6mg, Potassium: 292mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 3g, Vitamin A: 1025IU, Vitamin C: 17mg, Calcium: 12mg, Iron: 1mg

Nutrition information provided is an estimate. It will vary based on cooking method and specific ingredients used.

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How to peel and seed a tomato - showing peeled tomato on cutting board

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Comments

  1. Thank you! Worked perfectly and I was able to save off the juice from my beefsteak tomatoes when I sliced them, yummmmm🥳

  2. Worked perfectly! We have a recipe for a dip that calls for peeled tomatoes that in the past (pre-internet) I struggled with peeling a fresh tomato. That turned out to be very tedious and time consuming. This was so simple and also a great way to discard the seeds. Thanks! I’m looking forward to reviewing other tutorials and recipes.