How to Cook Edamame

5 from 5 votes

Learn how to cook edamame 4 ways: boiled, steamed, microwaved, and pan-seared. They're a delicious addition to salads, stir-fries, and more!

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Edamame – those bright green soybeans nestled in their cozy pods – are a snack that’s as fun to eat as it is healthy. Cooking edamame is so easy, and whether you choose to boil, steam, microwave, or pan-sear them, you’re just minutes away from a deliciously satisfying treat. This guide walks you through each method, ensuring you get perfectly tender edamame seasoned just right with a sprinkle of salt.

Cooked edamame pods in a bowl.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Learn How to Cook Edamame
  2. Ingredients to Make Edamame
  3. How to Cook Edamame 4 Ways
  4. Tips for Cooking Edamame Beans
  5. Recipes to Make With Edamame
  6. How to Reheat and Store Cooked Edamame
  7. Frequently Asked Questions
  8. More Cooking Tutorials:
  9. How to Cook Edamame Recipe

Eating Edamame is a great way to get some extra protein into your day, and it’s also incredibly versatile. Serve it up as a starter, a snack, or a side – no matter how you enjoy it, edamame is a simple pleasure that’s both nourishing and delightfully easy to prepare. So, grab that bag of frozen edamame, and let’s get cooking!

Why Learn How to Cook Edamame

  • Elevate your next meal instantly. Knowing how to cook edamame from frozen pods is a simple kitchen skill that can transform even the basic meal. It adds a pop of color, fun texture, and a nutritional power punch to your dishes.
  • Ease of preparation. This simple tutorial will show you how to cook edamame on the stove in 3 different ways or effortlessly in the microwave. With very minimal prep and a one-ingredient list, mastering this basic kitchen skill is a breeze!
  • Delicious flavor and texture with all cooking methods. Whether you use the stovetop or steam them in the microwave, these methods promise that every bite has a perfect blend of crunch, freshness, and flavor.

Ingredients to Make Edamame

Bowl of edamame pods.
  • Frozen edamame: You’ll find bagged frozen edamame in the frozen vegetable aisle at your local grocery store. Frozen edamame is picked and preserved at its peak ripeness and flash-frozen to lock in its nutritional benefits.

How to Cook Edamame 4 Ways

Cooking edamame is one of the easiest skills you’ll master. The hardest part is choosing between boiling, steaming, microwaving, or pan-frying them. I cover all 4 ways to cook edamame beans to achieve perfectly crunchy, tender, and delicious edamame beans.

How to Boil Edamame

  1. Add water and salt to a medium pot and bring to a boil. Add the edamame pods to the boiling water and cook until tender.
  2. Drain the edamame and let them cool slightly before serving. Season with salt, if desired.
2 image collage of edamame in a pot of water before cooking and then a strainer after cooking.

How to Steam Edamame

  1. Add the water to a medium pot and bring to a boil. Place a steamer basket in a pot and add the edamame pods. Cover the pot and steam until the pods are tender.
  2. Remove edamame pods from the steamer basket and sprinkle with salt if desired.
2 image collage of edamame in a steamer basket before and after steaming.

How to Cook Edamame in the Microwave

  1. Place the edamame pods in a microwave-safe dish. Cover the dish with a lid, leaving a small vent. Microwave on high until the edamame is heated through.
  2. Season with salt and toss before serving.
2 image collage of edamame in a microwave safe bowl before cooking with a lid partially covering bowl, and then after cooking.

How to Pan-Sear Edamame

  1. Heat a large skillet or pan over medium-high heat. Add olive oil to the pan. Add the edamame pods and saute until they develop a slightly charred exterior.
  2. Once tender and charred to your liking, season with salt to taste. Remove from the pan and serve immediately.
2 image collage of edamame in a skillet before pan frying and after pan frying.

Tips for Cooking Edamame Beans

  1. Steam properly. When adding the steamer basket to the pot, ensure the water does not touch the bottom of the basket.
  2. Achieve pan-seared perfection: A hot skillet and a touch of olive oil results in a deliciously crispy texture. Give the edamame beans time to char on medium-high heat before disturbing them.
  3. Season right after cooking. Sprinkle with salt, garlic powder, chili flakes, or a squeeze of fresh lemon juice immediately after cooking as the heat will help absorb the flavors.
  4. Season the water. Infuse the cooking water with fresh ginger slices or lemon wedges for a subtle hint of flavor.

Recipes to Make With Edamame

Edamame is a great snack or simple side dish on its own. Consider serving edamame beans as an easy shared appetizer at your next gathering. But edamame is also great added to recipes like salads and power bowls. Check out these delicious ideas:

How to Reheat and Store Cooked Edamame

Store cooked edamame in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Reheat in a microwave-safe dish, covered with a damp paper towel, and heat on high in 30-second intervals until warmed through.

How Long Will Cooked Edamame Last in the Fridge?

Cooked edamame will last in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Can I Freeze Cooked Edamame?

You can flash-freeze the edamame first by spreading them in a single layer on a baking sheet. Freeze until firm, then transfer the frozen edamame pods to a zip-top freezer bag. Seal well and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator or you can quickly blanch them in boiling water or microwave to reheat.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to defrost the edamame before cooking?

No, it is not necessary to defrost frozen edamame. Simply add it to your pot, steamer, or pan and cook per instructions. The heat will gradually thaw the pods and subsequently cook them.

How can I tell if the edamame is fully cooked?

To determine if your edamame beans are properly cooked, squeeze one between your fingers. The flesh should break apart, with the beans popping out quite easily. If it doesn’t, it needs to be cooked a little longer.

Is it better to steam, boil, or pan-fry edamame?

The cooking method is a matter of personal preference. Steaming edamame results in very brightly colored beans with a nice crispy texture, while boiling edamame is often more convenient with fewer dishes to wash but may offer a slightly softer texture. Pan-seared edamame adds a layer of complex flavors thanks to the high heat and addition of oil. Whether you are looking for vibrant steamed edamame, the convenience of boiled pods, or pan-seared perfection, the choice is yours to enjoy!

Pan-seared whole edamame pods in a skillet, garnished with flaky sea salt.

Edamame beans offer a versatile and nutritious addition to your meals. And now that you know how to cook edamame in 4 different ways, you can elevate your next meal however you wish. Knowing how to cook edamame beans creates endless possibilities in the kitchen!

More Cooking Tutorials:

If you found this tutorial for How to Cook Edamame – 4 Ways helpful or if you try any recipe on Feel Good Foodie, then don’t forget to rate the recipe and leave a comment below! It helps others who are thinking of trying out this tutorial and we would love to hear about your experience. And if you snapped some shots, share it on Instagram so we can repost on Stories!

How to Cook Edamame

Learn how to cook edamame 4 ways: boiled, steamed, microwaved, and pan-seared. They're a delicious addition to salads, stir-fries, and more!
5 from 5 votes
Servings 4 servings
Course Tutorial
Calories 0.3
Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 7 minutes

Ingredients
  

  • 1 10 ounce bag frozen edamame in the pod
  • 2 cups water for boiled & steamed only
  • ½ teaspoon salt plus more to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil for pan-seared only

Instructions

Boiled

  • Add the water and salt to a medium pot and bring to a boil.
  • Add the edamame pods to the boiling water. Boil for 4-5 minutes or until the edamame pods are tender.
  • Drain the edamame and let them cool slightly before serving. Season with salt, if desired.

Steamed

  • Add the water to a medium pot and bring to a boil. Place a steamer basket in a pot, ensuring the water does not touch the bottom of the basket.
  • Add the edamame pods to the steamer basket and season with the salt.
  • Cover the pot and steam for 5-7 minutes until the edamame pods are tender.
  • Remove from the steamer and sprinkle with salt if desired.

Microwaved

  • Place the edamame pods in a microwave-safe dish. Cover the dish with a microwave-safe lid, leaving a small vent.
  • Microwave on high for 4-5 minutes or until the edamame is heated through.
  • Season with salt and toss before serving.

Pan-Seared

  • Heat a large skillet or pan over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil to the pan.
  • Add the edamame pods and sauté for 4-5 minutes or until they develop a slightly charred exterior.
  • Season with salt to taste. Remove from the pan and serve immediately.

Notes

The nurition label is for edamame pods only.
Storage: Store cooked edamame in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. Reheat in a microwave-safe dish, covered with a damp paper towel, and heat on high in 30-second intervals until warmed through. 
Tips: 
Steam properly. When adding the steamer basket to the pot, ensure the water does not touch the bottom of the basket.
Achieve pan-seared perfection: A hot skillet and a touch of olive oil results in a deliciously crispy texture. Give the edamame beans time to char on medium-high heat before disturbing them.
Season right after cooking. Sprinkle with salt, garlic powder, chili flakes, or a squeeze of fresh lemon juice immediately after cooking as the heat will help absorb the flavors.
Season the water. Infuse the cooking water with fresh ginger slices or lemon wedges for a subtle hint of flavor.
 

Nutrition

Serving: 2.5oz, Calories: 0.3kcal, Carbohydrates: 0.03g, Protein: 0.03g, Fat: 0.01g, Saturated Fat: 0.003g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.01g, Monounsaturated Fat: 0.003g, Sodium: 0.01mg, Potassium: 1mg, Fiber: 0.01g, Sugar: 0.01g, Vitamin C: 0.01mg, Calcium: 0.2mg, Iron: 0.01mg

Nutrition information provided is an estimate. It will vary based on cooking method and specific ingredients used.

Cuisine American
Course: Tutorial

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Comments

  1. Thank you for an incredibly easy, healthy, and DELICIOUS snack!!! We used your boiled recipe and WHOA!! Just like some we ate at a swanky restaurant! WIN!